Barry Cornwall poems

Barry Cornwall(21 November 1787 - 5 October 1874 / Leeds, England)
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The New-born Baby's Song

- by Barry Cornwall 71

When I was twenty inches long,
I could not hear the thrush's song;
The radiance of the morning skies
Was most displeasing to my eyes.

For loving looks, caressing words,
I cared no more than sun or birds;
But I could bite my mother's breast,
And that made up for all the rest.

Sit Down, Sad Soul

- by Barry Cornwall 70

SIT down, sad soul, and count
The moments flying:
Come,—tell the sweet amount
That 's lost by sighing!
How many smiles?—a score?
Then laugh, and count no more;
For day is dying.

Lie down, sad soul, and sleep,
And no more measure
The flight of Time, nor weep
The loss of leisure;
But here, by this lone stream,
Lie down with us, and dream
Of starry treasure.

We dream: do thou the same:
We love—for ever;
We laugh; yet few we shame,
The gentle, never.
Stay, then, till Sorrow dies;
Then—hope and happy skies
Are thine for ever!

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Poems by Barry Cornwall, Barry Cornwall's poems collection. Barry Cornwall is a classical and famous poet (21 November 1787 - 5 October 1874 / Leeds, England). Share all poems of Barry Cornwall.

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