Wallace Stevens poems

Wallace Stevens(October 2, 1879 - August 2, 1955 / Pennsylvania / United States)
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Disillusionment of Ten O'Clock

- by Wallace Stevens 52

The houses are haunted
By white night-gowns.
None are green,
Or purple with green rings,
Or green with yellow rings,
Or yellow with blue rings.
None of them are strange,
With socks of lace
And beaded ceintures.
People are not going
To dream of baboons and periwinkles.
Only, here and there, an old sailor,
Drunk and asleep in his boots,
Catches Tigers
In red weather.

The Emperor Of Ice-Cream

- by Wallace Stevens 51

Call the roller of big cigars,
The muscular one, and bid him whip
In kitchen cups concupiscent curds.
Let the wenches dawdle in such dress
As they are used to wear, and let the boys
Bring flowers in last month's newspapers.
Let be be finale of seem.
The only emperor is the emperor of ice-cream.

Take from the dresser of deal.
Lacking the three glass knobs, that sheet
On which she embroidered fantails once
And spread it so as to cover her face.
If her horny feet protrude, they come
To show how cold she is, and dumb.
Let the lamp affix its beam.
The only emperor is the emperor of ice-cream.

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Poems by Wallace Stevens, Wallace Stevens's poems collection. Wallace Stevens is a classical and famous poet (October 2, 1879 - August 2, 1955 / Pennsylvania / United States). Share all poems of Wallace Stevens.

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